PDA

View Full Version : PT Question for all you experienced guys



AndiRRT
07-31-2007, 10:15
Hi it's me again (Collective Groan!) . I was searching stuff online and found this Stew Smith guy on www.military.com (http://www.military.com) ,and there is a wealth of info there for me. I am actually excited to be doing this now! I wanted to know if any of you have tried any of his plans. There is free info, of which I have printed, but there are also programs that can be downloaded for $$$. I was hoping for some input before I spend a boatload (remember I am paying off student loans! lol).

Thanx!

Da-Chief
07-31-2007, 13:30
Hey Andi,

Keep your HR up above 140 for over 30 mins to 1 hour. 3-4 times a week. If you can't do 1 hour then start at 30 mins.

The thing is to work the areas that you know need working.

1. Always warm up..(this does not count as part of your time)

2. After warming up, stretch those muscles out (Doesn't count yet here either sorry!)

3. Start your exercise. Remember to give the body part your working that day at least one day off to recover, this does not mean you can't work 2 days in a row, but you could do Back and Legs/Triceps on one day, Gut and chest/Biceps/Butt on another.. Always try to do at least half of it being Cardio. Cardio is where your fat burning is going to happen.

Why Lift? Becuase when you build muscle mass and if your doing cardio, then you will build the strength you need for your PT sessions etc. But also Burn the fat. All of this of course helps your Metabolism increase which also helps you burn fat even while resting.

Did you know you burn more fat asleep at night then you do during your workout? Make sure you get enough sleep each night.

Eat Small Balanced meals if your working out like this. 4-5 a day which includes Snacks. Don't Go on a Crash diet as you can hurt your body while working out.

Hope this helps. I will post the PFT instruction on here tonight which also has the measurements so you can figure it out for yourself.

HMC

beavis
07-31-2007, 17:46
I have a couple of his books. A lot of his stuff is body weight stuff. I don't use it any more becuase I would rather lift weights. I like my kettlebells better.


Todd

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-01-2007, 02:41
So what is it you are looking at doing? Are you trying to prep for a class, pass a PRT, or just general health? Most things can be accomplished without spending a dime or consulting a guru.

But then I also think general fitness is pretty much common sense. Eat right & exercise. What more do you need?

I think it is pathetic when people spend a fortune on the latest gimmick or super supplement. I don’t know how many people have gotten excited about the cool thing they saw on an infomercial only to spend hundreds of dollars for an over sized dust collector and extra clutter around the house. It is even more pathetic when they are up to their eyeballs in bills and max’ed out credit cards but they insist on giving their paycheck to the peddler pushing boxed meals, wonder pills, marvel powder, magic elixirs, and various other forms of fitness snake oil. Of course many of these same people still smoke, dip, drink to excess, and can’t seem to pass a corner grease joint without a king sized portion of junk food…

…but somehow washing it down with a small “diet” soda makes it all okay and they are doing their part to stay in shape…


Force Health Protection: Nutrition and Exercise Resource Manual
http://www-nehc.med.navy.mil/hp/nutrit/forcehealth.htm
(& Health Promotion Topics in left colum)

NPC Physical Readiness Links
http://www.npc.navy.mil/CommandSupport/PhysicalReadiness/Links.htm

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-01-2007, 02:53
I am having a severe push-up problem. So I started doing the vertical ones against a wall and did 100 very easily.

Wouldn't 10 real push-ups be better than 100 fake push-ups?

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-02-2007, 04:17
I found a body fat percent calculator online where you plug in your measurments and it calculates the % for you.

Unless the online calculator uses Navy numbers, do not use it for Navy matters or you may end of screwing yourself. The Navy only cares about Navy numbers, so do not reply on other sources. Stick to the chart in OPNAVINST 6110.1H as mentioned in the other posting and try to get someone else to take the measurements that won't help you "cheat".

http://www.corpsman.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11784

8404
08-02-2007, 08:16
Chief PJ is right:

I would still ask that OSO officer you spoke with for the real way. I did find this link on the web.

http://www.he.net/~zone/prothd2.html

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-02-2007, 18:25
The "formula" is a chart and it is real easy to use. Just follow the column that matches your measurements to the box that give you your %.

Do a search and download OPNAVINST 6110.1H so you know exactly how BCA works and the standards you must meet.

(waist + hip) - neck = circumference

circumference compared to height on chart = est body fat %

Download OPNAVINST 6110.1H

8404
08-02-2007, 18:41
That is great news. 20 real push ups. Make sure you go all the way down.

OPNAVINST 6110.1H is a large file, otherwise I would have posted it here. Chief pj is right, read what the Navy expects.

Thanks chief pj for the reference.

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-03-2007, 07:20
Do your exercises the "Navy way" to maximize your return when it comes time for your PRT. Each service has their own way of doing the misc exercises and the proctor should not count the ones you do "wrong."

NEHC Correct Exercise Form (video clips)
http://www-nehc.med.navy.mil/hp/fitness/CEF.htm

NPC Physical Readiness GMT videos (scroll to bottom)
http://www.npc.navy.mil/CommandSupport/PhysicalReadiness/Links.htm

AndiRRT
08-03-2007, 08:35
NEHC Correct Exercise Form (video clips)
http://www-nehc.med.navy.mil/hp/fitness/CEF.htm

NPC Physical Readiness GMT videos (scroll to bottom)
http://www.npc.navy.mil/CommandSupport/PhysicalReadiness/Links.htm[/quote]


Okay Cheif PJ, I need A LOT of push-up practice. Right now I am just impressed with the fact that I have built up enough upper body strength to get myself of of the floor,so I haven't really been worrying about form, just doing them. 4 Days ago, I couldn't get even get one done correctly. I have been working at them daily, and can do 20-30, depending on how saore I am from the previous day. I am hoping that continual practice will make me better at it and STRONGER! Now I am afraid that I will get in the habit of doing them wrong! Thanks for the links.

old navy
08-03-2007, 09:51
When will you be attending OCS/OIS?

AndiRRT
08-03-2007, 12:42
When will you be attending OCS/OIS?
The plan is next summer after my last year of pre-med and the MCAT

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-04-2007, 04:17
Did I read in OPnaVinst correctly the if my hands conme off of my shoulders doing situps, I fail? even just once?

NO, you did not read it correctly.

It reads that the curl-up test is over and the proctor will not count any more curl-up's if you commit one or more of the five 'infractions' listed, including failure to maintain contact of your hands against your chest or shoulders.

8404
08-04-2007, 08:20
Andi;

If you're hands come off your shoulders or chest, that one repetition of a sit-up is not counted. Counting resumes with the next proper sit-up, proper positioning of hands etc.

HMC-FMF-PJ
08-04-2007, 10:10
While a good number of people do in fact count curl-ups that way, they are counting incorrectly.

The by-the-book rule is the "event is ended." No further repetitions are to be counted.

Hands coming off the shoulders during curl-ups is to be treated the same as falling on your face during push-ups: You're done, next event....

Ref: OPNAVINST 6110.1H, Encl 7, Pg 5.

KentuckyBoy
08-04-2007, 10:22
I've been in the Navy for about 10 months, and I would say I've run about 12-15 PFA, PRT, PFT, whatever the hell you want to call it. Basically I call it the 1.5 miler and the 3 miler because it gets too confusing. The way I've seen them done, you partner up, person A does sit ups, B does sit ups, A does push ups, B does push ups, everybody runs. Since the sit ups and push ups are 2 minutes, you have a 2 minute break.
Your partner counts your push ups and sit ups so it depends on how strict of a partner you have as to what counts and what doesn't. Also depends on how good at counting he is. A couple of proctors will walk around and supervise, telling people "come all the way up" "get your ass outta the air" "that doesn't count" whatever.
With the push ups, you can only rest in the up position, you can not put your ass up in the air (unless your advertising as my HM2 says) and you can not let your ass sag to the ground. You can NOT remove your feet or hands from the deck at any time. i.e. to shake out your arms.
Sit ups, keep your hands across your chest and don't grab your t-shirt. Come up and let your elbows touch your thigh. Also, don't rock your body to get up. If your hands come off your chest you are done. Depending on how many you did and your age bracket will tell you if you passed or not.
Hope that helps. The PFA's that I ran were at Boot, A school, PSI, FMTB, and 3rd Med BN.

AndiRRT
08-06-2007, 12:35
I've been in the Navy for about 10 months, and I would say I've run about 12-15 PFA, PRT, PFT, whatever the hell you want to call it. Basically I call it the 1.5 miler and the 3 miler because it gets too confusing. The way I've seen them done, you partner up, person A does sit ups, B does sit ups, A does push ups, B does push ups, everybody runs. Since the sit ups and push ups are 2 minutes, you have a 2 minute break.
Your partner counts your push ups and sit ups so it depends on how strict of a partner you have as to what counts and what doesn't. Also depends on how good at counting he is. A couple of proctors will walk around and supervise, telling people "come all the way up" "get your ass outta the air" "that doesn't count" whatever.
With the push ups, you can only rest in the up position, you can not put your ass up in the air (unless your advertising as my HM2 says) and you can not let your ass sag to the ground. You can NOT remove your feet or hands from the deck at any time. i.e. to shake out your arms.
Sit ups, keep your hands across your chest and don't grab your t-shirt. Come up and let your elbows touch your thigh. Also, don't rock your body to get up. If your hands come off your chest you are done. Depending on how many you did and your age bracket will tell you if you passed or not.
Hope that helps. The PFA's that I ran were at Boot, A school, PSI, FMTB, and 3rd Med BN.



Yes this helps a great deal, thank you! I just have to keep plugging away at it. I have some other things working against me, so I want to do as well as I can. If I do and ace the MCAT, i don't foresee a problem.

The_Dirty_Name
08-07-2007, 08:58
Greetings all.

The advice given in this thread is high caliber.
Thank You HMC-FMF-PJ for the links.

Some good tips.


Get plenty of sleep. When your body rejuvenates from your training your results manifest.
Nutrition is a HUGE factor. Go as organic as possible. Keep away from high sugar chow (10 plus grams/severing) and processed foods. Eat a carbohydrate dense breakfast. This is the best times to consume low glycemic carbs. Try not to consume high glycemic carbs, btw. Do not be afraid of lipids (fat). Omega-3 fatty acids are your go to guy now. Deep six the hydrogenated oils.
When your body begins training there are two physiological changes.
Neuromuscular changes. Essentially, right know your body does not have the pattern needed to fire the correct nerves to get the ol pec major muscles going. If you stay at it, in about a couple of months your body will adapt to the stimulus your providing. You will feel much stronger and fit.
Intracellular (inside cell) changes. Here the muscle cells themselves are adapting. They are taking in blood sugar better (prevents insulin resistance), burning fat better (less fatty acids from going to adipose tissue), and the sacromere* itself improves its ability to contract. Muscles cells do not multiple in number. A little bit of me dies inside when I hear people say they are turning fat into muscle.
4. Train the same way Race Car drivers race on a road course. Unlike oval racing, the crew chief will calculate the number of pit stops you will need and on what laps to be in condition for the win, before the race even starts. Simply put, the date you ship out will be the last lap. You need to get yourself set-up to be in shape on that day. So get a calendar and calculate the number of laps, err days you have until the finish line, err ship date. From here set-up a conservative approach that will improve your fitness without causing undue wear and tear on your car, err body.
Seems like you have until next summer. To me this is like a 24 hour race. So you have time on your side, however, this is a lot of time to manage such things as calculating fuel (nutrition), tire wear (shoes), and keeping your drivers focused (just you).
For example. Calculate how many push-ups you will need to add every couple of weeks to make a GOOD score on the PFA.


Baby steps. Because you have such much time, start out slow and DON’T stop progressing your actives. Especially if you are deconditioned. Swimming is a great fundamental conditioning exercise. Go out of your way and find a pool. It is low impact, tones muscles, burns calories like no other, provides a base of cardiovascular fitness that needs to be established, and will also help you in bootcamp.
Jogging. Be careful here. No need to start developing stress fractures now when you can drop some body fat and tone up while swimming now.
Do not worry about the scales. Focus on body composition. As your fitness improves your body composition WILL change, but your weight may stay the same. Meaning, you may drop body fat, but actually increase the mass inside the muscles, thus causing no net difference in body weight. In the Navy there is a POD (Plan of the Day). You will need one every day to layout your strategy to get the job done.

Have a good’n.




*http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcomere

AndiRRT
08-07-2007, 09:58
Spoken scientifically, which is my language as I am a co\mplete science GEEK! lol. A lot of the things you have mentioned are things I am doing. I have not been so worried about weight, but am taping myself daily. The results have been a huge source of motivation thus far. I just found out minutes ago that my OCS (excuse me, ODS, she said the name has changed to Officer Development School) will be pushed back another YEAR. I thought I was going in before my last year of pre-med, but it seems that is incorrect and I will go in the summer before i start med school, so I have even more time to deal with. I am trying to not look at it as an excuse to procrastinate, but rather an opportunity to be even more physically fit when I enter. I am currently looking into switching gyms. The membership I currently have does not grant me access to a pool, and I would feel so much better about all of this if I could just get in the water. There, I know what I am doing. Running has never been my area of expertise. I can and will, but I just feel more at home in a pool (a good olympic-sized to be exact. less turns, more swim).
Thanks for the input. All of you guys have been so awesome, and I greatly appreciate your taking the time to help!

DeeDee
08-07-2007, 19:00
Andi - that is what everyone is here for - to support each other and offer suggestions when asked. :D